Shameless: Blair appointee Margaret Hodge Covered For Pedophiles in Her District

Spotlight on Abuse

And Still She Remains in Political Office…

Rothschild-Margaret-Hodge-Nee-Oppenheimer

Rothschild Zionist Margaret Hodge (née Oppenheimer)

‘Immediately after Tony Blair appointed Margaret Hodge as the new Minister for Children in his recent reshuffle, phones started ringing among former social workers who had once worked under her. “It’s like putting the fox in charge of the chickens,” one commented in disgust. “A sick joke,” remarked another.

These social workers couldn’t help recalling the inside story of an appalling child sex abuse scandal many of us have forgotten. In 1990, when Mrs Hodge – then Mr Blair’s neighbour in Richmond Crescent, Islington – was the leader of Islington council, these senior social workers had reported to her that a paedophile ring was operating in the borough and that children were being sexually abused in Islington care homes. Mrs Hodge’s response was revealing: she chose not to back a thorough investigation. Instead, she dismissed their concerns and accused these social workers of being ” obsessional”.

When the story was exposed in the Evening Standard two-and a half years later, in October 1992, her response was equally aggressive. She accused the newspaper of “a sensationalist piece of gutter journalism”. It would be a further two-and-a-half years and five independent reports later before she would half-heartedly admit that she was wrong. Yet she would have known as early as 1991 that paedophiles were preying on children in Islington’s care.’

————————————————————

Tony Blair then made this person Minister for Children.

Evil-Smile-Blair

‘Yes, I made her Children’s Minister – so what’s the problem?’

If ever a picture captured the essence of someone.

Source: 21stCenturyWire

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Set out below are 9 articles from 1993 up to and including 2008, all in connection with the child abuse that was taking place within the Islington and Welsh care homes. I will remind you that the fire in Brighton that killed 5 abuse victims is connected to Derek Laud who was great friends (probably still is) with the Cunt Cameron.

Course, you should know by now that I am positive that Cameron is a nonce. Never the less, even if you don’t buy into that, there  cannot be a single person with half a brain who, given all the facts could make a credible argument to support our vile, twisted, criminal Prime Minister not knowing about what was/is going on within the care homes and those government nonces involved in child rape.

That he hasn’t outed these vile nonces in turn makes him at best an accessory after the fact to a crime, time and time again:

An accessory after the fact to an offence is one who, knowing any person to have been a party to the offence, receives, comforts, or assists that person or tampers with or actively suppresses any evidence against him, in order to enable him to escape after arrest or to avoid arrest or conviction.

He is also guilty of many, many counts of Perverting the Course of Justice which has a maximum sentence of Life imprisonment and the fact that he has some of these nonces within his government makes him a monster. Hands up who thinks its okay for a criminal Monster to run the country.

No one is above the law.

As for the vile paedophile, Slag Mag Hodge Oppenheimer … Words fail me. At best, the cunt should be in prison. Yet she remains a prominent Member of Parliament. As you would expect, Slag Mag is an MBE. The vile cunt in the Palace always rewards her own.

It totally, totally blows my mind that the Nation is being run by murderers, rapists, paedophiles, serial adulterers, sex pests, fraudsters, thieves and at best, accomplices to all the afore mentioned crimes. And even worse than that! Hardly anyone in the Cunt-ry gives a fuck.

There is not one… Not one prominent Politician that I cannot link to that list. And yes, for all those of you living in weirdy beardy man on a cloud cuckoo land who defended George ‘silence is golden’ Galloway last week, he is included in that list.

What next! Ian Huntley for Prime Minister? Roy Whiting for Chancellor? Michael Stone for Foreign Secretary? I know, let’s stick Ian Brady in the House of Lords.

The only difference that separates those four Twisted Monsters and the British Government is a private education.

  

Yes Minister, you were told about child abuse in the care homes, yet you refused to listen (30.6.03)

Yes Minister, you were told about child abuse in the care homes, yet you refused to listen;
SPECIAL STANDARD INVESTIGATION: When Margaret Hodge led Islington council, she knew about sex abuse in care homes under her control. Yet she kept quiet and pilloried social workers who raised concerns. Now the original whistleblower wants the Minister for Children brought to account.

Evening Standard, 30th June 2003
By David Cohen

IMMEDIATELY after Tony Blair appointed Margaret Hodge as the new Minister for Children in his recent reshuffle, phones started ringing among former social workers who had once worked under her. “It’s like putting the fox in charge of the chickens,” one commented in disgust. “A sick joke,” remarked another.

These social workers couldn’t help recalling the inside story of an appalling child sex abuse scandal many of us have forgotten. In 1990, when Mrs Hodge – then Mr Blair’s neighbour in Richmond Crescent, Islington – was the leader of Islington council, these senior social workers had reported to her that a paedophile ring was operating in the borough and that children were being sexually abused in Islington care homes.
Mrs Hodge’s response was revealing: she chose not to back a thorough investigation. Instead, she dismissed their concerns and accused these social workers of being ” obsessional”.

When the story was exposed in the Evening Standard two-andahalf years later, in October 1992, her re-sponse was equally aggressive. She accused the newspaper of “a sensationalist piece of gutter journalism”. It would be a further two-and-a-half years and five independent reports later before she would half-heartedly admit that she was wrong. Yet she would have known as early as 1991 that paedophiles were preying on children in Islington’s care.

In 1991, Roy Caterer, a sports instructor at a boarding school used by Islington, was arrested and sent to prison for seven-anda-half years for abusing seven boys and two girls, some of them in Islington’s care. Caterer admitted to police that he had abused countless Islington children over many years.

In 1995, an independent report prepared by Ian White, Oxfordshire’s director of social services, utterly vin-dicated the Evening Standard. It lambasted the council and confirmed that the social workers and the Stand-ard, whose reporters went on to win prestigious press awards, were right. It said, in part: “The inquiry has charted an organisation in the late 1980s and early 1990s that was chaotic. Such a chaotic organisation breeds the conditions for dangerous and negligent professional practices in relation to child care.”

Mrs Hodge led Islington council from 1982 to 1992.
What the Standard uncovered – after taping hours of interviews with staff, parents, children and police over a three-month period – was a horrendous dereliction of duty by the council that routinely exposed the most vulnerable children in its care to paedophiles, pimps, prostitutes and pornographers.

What the Standard and the White report found inexcusable was the council’s refusal – led by Margaret Hodge – to listen and act when experienced staff and terrified children tried to articulate what was going on. Their testimonies lifted the lid on horrific events that were taking place in Islington: teenagers selling sex from their council homes, a girl knifed by a sexual abuser inside a children’s unit, a girl and a boy who shared a bed with a known paedophile, a 15-year-old boy fostered with a suspected paedophile – overriding the vociferous protests of social workers – who later sexually abused the boy as predicted. We could go on and on.
The tragedy was that from the moment these children came to live in the seemingly safe children’s homes under the care of Islington council, they became fair game.

Some of the very people who were supposed to protect them were involved in their sexual abuse. On top of all this, the social workers who tried to protect them were pilloried by Margaret Hodge and her social services directors. The damage done to such children is beyond comprehension.

But the story of the Islington child sex abuse scandal would never have seen the light of day had it not been for the brave actions of a single secret whistleblower. Until today, the identity of this whistleblower has remained a secret. Nobody outside a tiny coterie of key players knew who he – or she – was. And so it would have remained. But in the wake of Mrs Hodge’s appointment as Minister for Children, the whistleblower has decided to blow her cover. She doesn’t come to this decision lightly.

But so indignant is she at this ” cynical appointment” that she has decided to tell – for the first time – the full story of what really happened.

She wants us to know the truth about our new Minister for Children. For Mrs Hodge and her management team were never made properly accountable for what happened to the children whom they failed. Instead, the whistleblower and her supporters were marginalised, whereas Mrs Hodge is now a rising star in government.
The whistleblower’s identity, we can reveal, is Liz Davies, 55. She is now a successful senior lecturer in so-cial work at London Metropolitan University.

But back in 1990, Liz Davies was the senior social worker heading up a team of six in the Irene Watson Neighbourhood Office, one of 24 similarly decentralised council offices in Islington. In speaking out, she is joined by another insider who has also hitherto remained silent – her former ally and manager, David Cofie, 63. Other social workers from that time in Islington are prepared to support the position taken by Mrs Davies and Mr Cofie.

“Margaret Hodge definitely knew everything right from the start, and by ‘start’ I mean more than two years before it was exposed in your newspaper,” begins Mrs Davies, talking to the Standard in north London. “She knew as early as April 1990 that we had uncovered serious evidence of sexual abuse among children in our care and yet she chose not to pursue our investigation.”

Her story starts at the beginning of the Nineties. “I noticed that there was a sudden unexpected increase in vulnerable teenagers coming to our office to see social workers,” recalls Mrs Davies. “They’d be crying and depressed and they didn’t want to talk. I didn’t understand it. We spent a lot of time engaging with these children and began to closely investigate their lives.”

Soon Mrs Davies and Mr Cofie began to realise that sexual abuse was part of the picture.
“The children were displaying classic symptoms of sexual abuse and we started to hear disturbing stories of a paedophile ring. At this point, we had no idea as to the scale of the network, or that the children’s homes – under our control – were involved. We began working closely with the Islington Child Protection officers and following local and national child protection procedures to the letter.”

Mr Cofie and Mrs Davies collated the information in a series of reports that were presented to the directors of social services. They responsibly asked for additional funds for two youth workers to be seconded to their team to help with investigations, which were snowballing and threatening to overwhelm them. But their request drew an icy rebuke from their council leader. In a memo to the head of Isington’s social services, John Rea Price (a copy of which is in the possession of the Standard), dated April 1990 – written on “Islington council leader’s office” stationery and from “Margaret Hodge, Leader” – Mrs Hodge wrote the following: “Sexual Abuse in Irene Watson Area: David Cofie raised the issue of sexual abuse among eight- to 16-year-old children at the Neighbourhood Forum. He is clearly concerned about the matter. However, simply requesting more resources is not, in my view, responsible for a manager given the well known concern of members at the state of the Social Services budget. I expect more appropriate responses from people in management positions in Social Services. The obvious option for your management to consider in relation to this emerging problem in the area is to reduce the fieldwork staffing to release resources for a detached youth worker in the area. I await your response.”

“We couldn’t believe it,” recalls Mrs Davies. “We were grappling with this enormous problem and all she was concerned about was balancing her budget. It boggles the mind. It was as if we were talking about park benches, not children.”

Because this critical memo was not made available to Standard reporters at the time of the investiga-tion-only coming to light years later, in May 1995, Mrs Hodge was never made to explain how it was she knew about the allegations of abuse for over two years without fully pursuing them.

David Cofie, in a separate interview, says that the standard procedure would have been for the matter to be referred to the child protection committee for a full investigation, but that this did not happen. Mr Cofie says that Mrs Hodge resisted his requests that the matter be properly investigated on three separate occasions. “The first occasion was when I decided the only responsible thing was to alert the community to the fact that paedophiles were operating in the area,” he recalls. “I wrote a short, subtly-worded report that was to be dis-tributed to the Neighbourhood Forum, which is open to members of the public. Well, Margaret Hodge went apeshit. She started screaming and shouting at me and refused to discuss it. I later heard that she had rub-bished me to colleagues behind my back, saying that I was exaggerating the sexual abuse claims and trying to make a name for myself.

But my colleagues told her, ‘David would never do that. If anything, he’s one of the most overcautious managers we have.’ ” In May 1990, Mr Cofie and Mrs Davies were summoned to a meeting convened by Islington’s assistant director of social services, Lyn Cusack. “By now,” says Mrs Davies, “we knew that the picture was far worse than initially imagined. I had learned that children in our care were being taken to homes in the country on weekends. It was highly suspicious, and I would later discover that they were being used to make child pornography and that people who ran our homes were getting paid in hard cash. But we were criticised as ‘hysterical’ and told in no uncertain terms to stop interviewing children and to cease child protection conferences forthwith.”

Mrs Davies and Mr Cofie continued to investigate regardless. They wrote and submitted 15 detailed reports but maintain their superiors still did not believe them. When the paedophile Roy Caterer, whose name Mrs Davies passed to the police, went to prison, Mr Cofie said to Mrs Davies: “Now they’ve got to believe us.” But Mrs Hodge and Lyn Cusack and their acolytes – inexplicably – still weren’t interested. The crunch for Mrs Davies came when she was ordered to place a “looked-after” seven-year-old boy in a home that was run by someone she had raised concerns about and considered unsafe. Her position had become untenable.

At the same time, she had started having a recurring nightmare. In the dream, Mrs Davies would be drinking a lovely glass of cold white wine that would suddenly turn into jagged pieces of glass that cut her throat to bloody ribbons. A friend told her: “It’s obvious, Liz, it’s all too much for you to swallow.”

In February 1992, Mrs Davies resigned in despair and took her information to Mike Hames, then head of Scotland Yard’s Obscene Publications Unit. He commenced an investigation, subsequently exposed in the Standard by Eileen Fairweather and Stewart Payne. More than 50 reports were published in the paper – which Mrs Hodge scornfully condemned – leading eventually to five independent inquiries.

It was another two-and-a-half years before the damning White report would be published – singling out and naming 22 people who worked for Islington and whose names were never published. Mrs Hodge went on the record to say that she was led astray, that her only fault was in believing her senior officers like Lyn Cu-sack. Those on the inside – like Mrs Davies – have always believed this was a fudge.

The critical April 1990 memo, which we reprint above, shows that Mrs Hodge’s claim is, at the very least, an oversimplification. It shows that when Mrs Hodge was directly presented with details of the sexual abuse allegations uncovered by Mr Cofie and Mrs Davies, she was apparently more concerned with allocating re-sources than addressing the substance of the allegations.

By the time the White report was published, Mrs Hodge had moved on. She would take up a top job in the City, then become MP for Barking, and later Minister for Higher Education. And now she is Minister for Chil-dren. David Cofie, on the other hand, stayed on at Islington until he retired in 1998.

So did Mrs Hodge ever thank Mr Cofie for the role he played in bringing to light this appalling scandal?
” Hodge never thanked me,” Mr Cofie says. “Nor did she apologise. Even though she had wrecked my ca-reer, frozen me out, made me persona non grata.

She was never a big enough person to say to me, ‘I am sorry for how I treated you. I was wrong. Thank you for what you did to save those children.’ ” Mrs Davies is even more scathing.

“It beggars belief to think that Tony Blair has awarded Hodge the highest job in the land for protecting the welfare of our most vulnerable citizens.

Blair was her neighbour at the time. He must remember her appalling record.
What in heaven’s name was he thinking?”

How scandal unfolded
1982: Margaret Hodge becomes leader of Islington council
February 1990: Liz Davies and David Cofie, senior Islington social workers, uncover evidence of sexual abuse of children, and report it to a Neighbourhood Forum which council leader Margaret Hodge attends as ward councillor.

April 1990: Hodge memos Cofie’s boss, John Rea Price, the director of social services: “David Cofie raised the issue of sexual abuse among eight-to 16-year-old children. He is clearly concerned. However, simply requesting more resources is not responsible for a manager given the concern of members at the state of the social services budget. I expect more appropriate responses from people in management positions in social services”.

May 1990: At a key meeting chaired by Lyn Cusack, assistant director of social services, Cofie and Davies are told to cease interviewing children and to stop convening child protection conferences

1991: Roy Caterer, who worked at a school used by Islington council for its children in care, is arrested for sexually abusing seven boys and two girls, and is jailed for seven-and-a-half years. Cofie and Davies ask social services for resources to help the victims, but receive no reply

February 1992: Davies resigns and takes her information to Scotland Yard
6 October 1992: A Standard investigation reveals that a 15-year-old girl worked as a prostitute from a coun-cil home; a 16-year-old was made pregnant at a teenage unit by a man suspected of involvement in a child sex ring; a girl was knifed by a pimp at an Islington home; and a boy was abused for years by a volunteer instructor
14 October 1992: Hodge says of the Standard’s investigation: “The way they chose to report this was gutter journalism … The story misled the public on the quality of childcare services in the borough”
23 October 1992: Hodge steps down as council leader to take up a post as a senior consultant with ac-countancy firm Price Waterhouse
3 March 1993: The Press Complaints Commission rejects all Islington’s complaints against the Standard
11 February 1994: Hodge admits to the Standard: “You were right that there was abuse in the children’s homes,” and blames her initial response on “misleading” information from senior officers and colleagues
23 May 1995: Report by Ian White, Oxfordshire director of social services, backs the Standard and says care-home workers were able to corrupt children in part because Islington’s ideological policies prevented complaints being investigated. Hodge responds: “I have had no involvement with Islington council for three years. It would be inappropriate for me to comment”
26 May 1995: Hodge tells Radio 4: “Of course I accept responsibility. I was leader of the council at the time”
13 June 2003: Hodge becomes Minister for Children
27 June 2003: Hodge tells Women’s Hour on BBC Radio 4: “I don’t think that any of us recognised the danger of child abuse in children’s homes to the extent that we’re aware of it now. I’ve learned from my fail-ure to understand at that time”

Last month this man killed himself in Thailand after being accused of sexually abusing 300 boys (11.6.06)

Last month this man killed himself in Thailand after being accused of sexually abusing 300 boys. I have to ask the disturbing question: Would these boys have suffered if Margaret Hodge’s London council had not protected him?;
Manyyears later onevictim spoke out,only for Hodge to discredit him as ‘disturbed’. I can reveal the source of this evil slurwas none other than the paedophile who abused him

Mail on Sunday, 11th June 2006
By Eileen Fairweather

The text message from Mike Hames, the former Scotland Yard pornography squad chief, was blunt: ‘Rabet’s topped himself.
It’s made my day.’ It arrived three weeks ago, as I was sitting in a sunny garden with Liz Davies, a woman with whom I had forged a deep and unlikely bond. We hadn’t seen each other for nine months and were talking about our kids.

Then Liz’s mobile phone beeped, drawing us back to a far less pleasant-past, when we both had to deal with the pain of working with abused children.
Liz and I had met in 1992. She was then a social worker who went on to help me and reporter Stewart Payne uncover a paedophile ring that had infiltrated children’s homes run by Islington Council.

We discovered that paedophiles had penetrated the network of homes so completely that they had begun using them to procure children. The council had wanted to encourage gay men into childcare in the interests of equal opportunities, but this well-intentioned aim was so naively implemented that paedophiles posed as gay men to take advantage of the policy.
The council exempted any man who said he was gay from needing professional qualifications or references, declared gay men less likely to abuse children than heterosexuals as a matter of policy and repeatedly as-sumed that any criticisms of men who claimed to be gay were motivated purely by homophobia. Even children who tearfully described abuse were considered prejudiced.

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Islington: The Missing Evidence (19.2.93)

Evening Standard, 19th February 1993

By Stewart Payne & Eileen Fairweather

THE documents that landed on the desk of senior Islington social services officials made grim reading. Their inspector, Mike Betts, was damning in his reports on the state of the council’s children’s homes and was demanding urgent action to protect the welfare of the youngsters who lived in them.
His reports could not have come at a worse time for Islington. Only weeks before, the Evening Standard had published the results of a three-month investigation into child care in the borough and had condemned the very same homes that Betts was now criticising.
Islington’s then leader Margaret Hodge had dismissed the Standard stories as ‘gutter journalism’, even though Health Secretary Virginia Bottomley said she was very concerned by the disclosures and her social services inspectorate ordered the council to investigate our allegations.
Officers were now faced with proof from one of their own experienced staff that the state of the homes was a matter of genuine concern.
The evidence amounted to a massive embarrassment for the council.

READ MORE

Country house hideaway of disgraced care chief (6.5.93)

Evening Standard, 6th May 1993
By Stewart Payne & Eileen Fairweather

BRITAIN’S leading consultant on children’s homes is at the centre of a nationwide police and social work investigation into allegations of sexual abuse against boys.

Peter Righton, 67, quit his post at the National Children’s Bureau last year after he was arrested and later convicted of possessing child pornography. But the Evening Standard can reveal that he is now the central figure in a new investigation into the suspected abuse of scores of boys over four decades.

When this investigation began, Righton and his male lover fled to a country estate which is also an educational and recreational centre for children. Teachers, parents and welfare officials who send children to the estate are unaware of the two men and the police investigation into alleged paedophilia.

The pair live at the Suffolk ancestral home of the 8th Baron Henniker, where they have adopted aliases.
Following the discovery of child pornography addressed to Righton, a senior and respected childcare expert, he was fined £900 last September for importing and possessing indecent material. He has been under police investigation ever since.

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Country life of a child abuser; ‘Rabet recruited many young boys to work at his activity centre’ (7.8.95)

Evening Standard, 7th August 1995
By Stewart Payne & Eileen Fairweather

NICHOLAS Rabet should never work with children. His name is on the Government’s Consultancy Register, a danger list of those thought to be unsafe to work with young people. But because he has been running a privately owned activity centre for teenagers, albeit used by local authorities, children’s charities, schools and families, that Government sanction is powerless. Rabet used to be deputy head of an Islington children’s home. The Evening Standard discovered, as part of its investigation into child welfare in the Labour-controlled borough, that Rabet ha been accused of sexually abusing a boy in his care and was linked to convicted paedophiles. The newspaper’s investigation, which highlighted how children were at risk while in Islington’s care, was supported by a series of independent reports. Two months ago, in the final and most damning report of all, Ian White, head of Oxfordshire Social Services, confirmed that many former Islington staff had been under suspicion of a range of misconduct, including abuse, but had not been properly investigated.

His shocking conclusions supported a central theme of the Evening Standard inquiry, namely that political correctness and a rigid adherence to equal opportunities policies had stifled proper investigation of those under suspicion. Most of these staff had now left to take up work elsewhere, some with children. He urged every local authority in the land employing former Islington staff to check back with the borough, where a new administration has promised to thoroughly investigate their backgrounds. Last week we revealed how two London social workers, formerly with Islington, were now under investigation by their current employers. We reported how four of those named in a confidential section of the White report are now on the Health Department’s Consultancy Register and at least 11 others are to follow. This register is used by local authorities as a means of preventing employing those thought unsuitable to work with children. But today we reveal how men like Rabet have nothing to fear from this list because it does not apply to the private sector.

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At last they admit it: we were right (23.5.95)

At last they admit it: we were right;
Damning report on Islington’s former social services department vindicate the Evening Standard’s long campaign against the evil men who preyed on children in council care

By Eileen Fairweather & Stewart Payne

An era that allowed pimps and paedophiles to flourish unchallenged at the hear of child care in Islington, corrupting and seducing vulnerable children bestowed into their care, is finally over. It has taken three and a half years. At first the scandal uncovered by the Standard’s Children at Risk investigation was dismissed by the council leader as ‘gutter journalism’, but inquiry after inquiry – there were four in all, prompted by an alarmed Department of Health – vindicated the Standard’s articles. This fifth and final inquiry marks the change of heart by the council and a new era for the exploited children of Islington.

POLITICAL correctness and a slavish adherence to equal opportunities stifled proper investigation of suspected child abusers employed by Islington Council, a report states today. Paedophiles cynically exploited a policy designed to prevent discrimination against homosexuals to escape scrutiny and some are still working in child care today.

READ MORE

Baby P’s relative is linked to big paedophile network (16.11.08)

Mail on Sunday, November 16 2008
By Eileen Fairweather

Baby P’s relative is linked to big paedophile network

A CLOSE male relative of Baby P was feared to have recruited youngsters in care for a notorious paedophile ring, according to a secret report seen by The Mail on Sunday.
Although he is not believed to have had any contact with Baby P, his involvement in a child abuse scandal in Islington, North London, in the early Nineties raises questions on the extent of checks into Baby P’s background.

‘The family should have been subjected to forensic examination,’ said a child protection expert. ‘Even cursory checks would have rung alarm bells. Social workers might then have removed the baby, as a paediatrician and police pleaded.’ The relative was named in reports as a victim and a feared recruiter of children for pimps. In the early Nineties he was put in a children’s home.

At the time, all 12 of Islington’s then homes, and at least one of the boarding schools it used, had been infiltrated by paedophiles. The relative, then a frightened 13-year-old, was under the control of three pimps – Alan, John and George – who persuaded him with money, drugs and threats to bring other children to them. He tried in vain to blow the whistle and protect himself and other children. He gave social workers the names of others ferried from the homes to, he said, Manor Park, Tottenham, Soho and Westminster to ‘be buggered by old men’.

Read More

Evening Standard special on 1992 Brighton Fire that killed 5 people (28.7.97)

ES28797c

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Passport to perversion (13.6.96)

Evening standard, 13th June 1996

By Eileen Fairweather

ANYONE who investigates child sex rings survives through grim jokes.
Yesterday a man appalled by newspaper reports of yet another children’s home scandal asked me how on earth so many paedophiles had infiltrated British childcare. ‘It was easy,’ I replied. ‘They just knocked on the door and said they liked little boys in shorts.’
John Major’s commission of a national inquiry on organised child abuse hasn’t come a moment too soon. The Cabinet is right to fear the public has totally lost confidence in Britain’s commitment to protecting its most vulnerable children.
He has also ordered a judicial inquiry into North Wales children’s homes, as demanded by the authors of the scandalously suppressed Clwyd report. This is brilliant news, but are inquiries alone enough? Repeated official inquiries have urged simple, sensible reforms to prevent paedophiles gaining access to children – and been ignored.

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Source: ChrisSpivey.co.uk

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